kateoplis:

"[A]ccording to NASA, a highly unusual ‘Tetrad’ – four successive total ‘blood-red’ lunar eclipses each followed by six full moons – will, indeed, start next Tuesday and finish on September 28 2015. The incredible alignment has only happened a handful of times in the last two thousand years but, remarkably, on each of the last three occasions it has coincided with a globally significant religious event.”
NASA: “This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015 - a series known as a Tetrad. …The 565-year period of the Tetrad ‘seasons’ is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth’s orbit. Consequently, the Tetrad period is gradually decreasing. In the distant future Tetrads will no longer be possible.”
Pastor and author John Hagee: “According to the Biblical prophecy, world history is about to change dramatically.
Every time this has happened in the last 500 years, it has coincided with tragedy for the Jewish people followed by triumph. And once again, for Israel, the timing of this Tetrad is remarkable. The first of the four blood moons will come on April 15 this year, during Passover. The second will be on October 8, at the time of the Feast of the Tabernacles. On April 4 2015, during Passover, we will have another blood moon. Then finally, on September 28, during next year’s Feast of the Tabernacles, the fourth blood and final moon will dawn.” 
Apocalypse Now

The Mayans didn’t mention this, but obviously we are all doomed.

kateoplis:

"[A]ccording to NASA, a highly unusual ‘Tetrad’ – four successive total ‘blood-red’ lunar eclipses each followed by six full moons – will, indeed, start next Tuesday and finish on September 28 2015. The incredible alignment has only happened a handful of times in the last two thousand years but, remarkably, on each of the last three occasions it has coincided with a globally significant religious event.”

NASA: “This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015 - a series known as a Tetrad. …The 565-year period of the Tetrad ‘seasons’ is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth’s orbit. Consequently, the Tetrad period is gradually decreasing. In the distant future Tetrads will no longer be possible.”

Pastor and author John Hagee: “According to the Biblical prophecy, world history is about to change dramatically.

Every time this has happened in the last 500 years, it has coincided with tragedy for the Jewish people followed by triumph. And once again, for Israel, the timing of this Tetrad is remarkable. The first of the four blood moons will come on April 15 this year, during Passover. The second will be on October 8, at the time of the Feast of the Tabernacles. On April 4 2015, during Passover, we will have another blood moon. Then finally, on September 28, during next year’s Feast of the Tabernacles, the fourth blood and final moon will dawn.” 

Apocalypse Now

The Mayans didn’t mention this, but obviously we are all doomed.

posted 2 weeks ago

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brightwalldarkroom:
theatlantic:
Why The Conversation Should Be Required Viewing at the NSA
Technology—iPhones, Google Glass, tablets, and the like—makes our day-to-day lives easier to quantify than ever. That’s a good thing, in many ways; more information about how people live can help, say, improve healthcare.
But fiction, from George Orwell’s 1984 to this weekend’s box-office hit Captain America: The Winter Soldier, has long warned us about the ways that data collection can also threaten privacy, freedom, and happiness. The most powerful cautionary tale for the Age of Big Data comes from an unlikely place: Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, which turns 40 today.
Read more.
A great article on a near perfect film.

What’s really interesting is that The Conversation ends with Harry Caul tearing his apartment to pieces looking for microphones that he’s convinced are there. If that isn’t a great analogy for our national security attitude post-9/11, I don’t know what is.

brightwalldarkroom:

theatlantic:

Why The Conversation Should Be Required Viewing at the NSA

Technology—iPhones, Google Glass, tablets, and the like—makes our day-to-day lives easier to quantify than ever. That’s a good thing, in many ways; more information about how people live can help, say, improve healthcare.

But fiction, from George Orwell’s 1984 to this weekend’s box-office hit Captain America: The Winter Soldier, has long warned us about the ways that data collection can also threaten privacy, freedom, and happiness. The most powerful cautionary tale for the Age of Big Data comes from an unlikely place: Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, which turns 40 today.

Read more.

A great article on a near perfect film.

What’s really interesting is that The Conversation ends with Harry Caul tearing his apartment to pieces looking for microphones that he’s convinced are there. If that isn’t a great analogy for our national security attitude post-9/11, I don’t know what is.

posted 2 weeks ago

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Western terminus.

Western terminus.

posted 2 weeks ago

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I don’t like this expression “First World problems.” It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World problems. All the silly stuff of life doesn’t disappear just because you’re black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations. Here’s a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are.

One event that illustrated the gap between the Africa of conjecture and the real Africa was the BlackBerry outage of a few weeks ago. Who would have thought Research In Motion’s technical issues would cause so much annoyance and inconvenience in a place like Lagos? But of course it did, because people don’t wake up with “poor African” pasted on their foreheads. They live as citizens of the modern world. None of this is to deny the existence of social stratification and elite structures here. There are lifestyles of the rich and famous, sure. But the interesting thing about modern technology is how socially mobile it is—quite literally. Everyone in Lagos has a phone.

Teju Cole (via fatmanatee)

See, this is the kind of stuff to get into my head! Teju Cole is the drill instructor for my brain.

posted 3 weeks ago

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The project in The Mindy Project seems to be “Take that, high school — I can too attract white guys.” So why isn’t it a Channing Tatum type instead of literally Seth Rogen? What bothers me is these guys don’t have to be/never are anything special. They’re just white and available, have stable jobs but rarely any distinguishing traits to speak of. And she is enthralled. Meanwhile the women these guys date are bombshells: Ed Helms with the “other Indian” girl, Mark Duplass with Maria Menounos. It maintains an apparatus that falsely inflates the value of whiteness and further undermines the self-esteem of brown kids.

Ayesha Siddiqi: “A ‘Mindy Project’ Round Table”

This is really good! (via bmichael)

Man, at first I was reading this and was just like “yeah, I guess it’s a problem that Mindy only dates or interacts with white people, like 95% of the show, but I don’t really need to read a conversation about it.”

But then I kept reading and really gets into some very fascinating stuff, like this:

"I kind of think about the way people make jokes about things like “Starbucks is for white girls” in a similar way to how people make “first-world problems” jokes — in that things are coded as white, completely flattening that brown people live textured lives."

UGH, you guys! That’s so spot on it hurts! And I have said “First-world problems” (or, “white people problems”, or “white whine”) so many times and its so silly because it somehow asserts privilege and denies validation in the same breath! It essentially says “your life is too fancy/rich/privileged to have legitimate problems” while also saying “third-world (read: non-white people) could never aspire to have such superficial problems.”

Anyway, I like hearing thoughtful criticism of things I like, and this round table fits that paradigm.

(Source: bmichael)

posted 3 weeks ago

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mapsontheweb:

Malaria risk zones in the world. -

Hold the phone! How did tiny little Lesotho completely eradicate malaria while surrounded by the malaria-spewing  mosquito pit that is South Africa?! (No disrespect to South Africa)

mapsontheweb:

Malaria risk zones in the world. -

Hold the phone! How did tiny little Lesotho completely eradicate malaria while surrounded by the malaria-spewing  mosquito pit that is South Africa?! (No disrespect to South Africa)

posted 3 weeks ago

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demons:

Testing of the F-117 Nighthawk (aka the Stealth Fighter) c. 1988

WHAT IS THIS, A PLANE FOR ANTS?!?!

demons:

Testing of the F-117 Nighthawk (aka the Stealth Fighter) c. 1988

WHAT IS THIS, A PLANE FOR ANTS?!?!

(Source: Flickr / sdasmarchives, via attentiondoozers)

posted 3 weeks ago

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The true Future Islands performance masterpiece.

For reference: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ee4bfu_t3c

posted 3 weeks ago

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Whoa Did Warren Buffett Get This Massively Important Prediction Wrong

mattstoller:

In November 22, 1999, Warren Buffett gave a speech in which he famously said he didn’t invest in technology stocks. His rationale was that you can’t predict who the winners and losers will be, only that society usually benefits. He cited the auto and airplane industries as losers for investors but winners for society. Anyway, on to Buffett’s bad prediction - in the speech he noted that the next 17 years of returns for equities would probably be lower than the spectacular returns from 1983-1999 (true), but that the standard of living for most people would be much higher.

They will have by then grown considerably wealthier, simply because the American business establishment that they own will have been chugging along, increasing its profits by 3% annually in real terms. Best of all, the rewards from this creation of wealth will have flowed through to Americans in general, who will be enjoying a far higher standard of living than they do today. That wouldn’t be a bad world at all—even if it doesn’t measure up to what investors got used to in the 17 years just passed.

Here’s a graph of median income for the last 17 years.

image

This Is Just To Say

I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
I am hungry
and the spending
power of
the dollar

is not
what it once
was

-William Carlos Williams, I think

(via soupsoup)

posted 4 weeks ago

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The gangs in this neighborhood are out of control.

The gangs in this neighborhood are out of control.

posted 1 month ago

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