You guys, it’s October 3rd!

You guys, it’s October 3rd!

posted 2 weeks ago

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Just a guy playing a didgeridoo inside an airport, as you do.

Just a guy playing a didgeridoo inside an airport, as you do.

posted 2 weeks ago

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abbyjean:

To get cash to her son, Pat used to purchase a money order at the post office for $1.25 and mail it to the prison, for a total cost of less than $2. But in March of last year, the Virginia Department of Corrections informed her that JPay Inc., a private company in Florida, would begin handling all deposits into inmates’ accounts.

Sending a money order through JPay takes too long, so Taylor started using her debit card to get him funds instead. To send Eddie $50, Taylor must pay $6.95 to JPay. Depending on how much she can afford to send, the fee can be as high as 35 percent. In other states, JPay’s fees approach 45 percent.

After the fee, the state takes out another 15 percent of her money for court fees and a mandatory savings account, which Eddie will receive upon his release in 2021, minus the interest, which goes to the Department of Corrections.

Eddie needs money to pay for basic needs like toothpaste, visits to the doctor and winter clothes. In some states families of inmates pay for toilet paper, electricity, even room and board, as governments increasingly shift the costs of imprisonment from taxpayers to the families of inmates.

“To give him $50, I have to send $70 off my card,” says Taylor, who moved to a smaller apartment on the outskirts of Johnson City in part because of the rising cost of supporting Eddie. “They’re punishing the families, not the inmates.”

See, this is exactly the kind of thing I’m talking about! We are making sure that anyone in prison is more than likely to return to prison so that we can make more money off of them. I’m surprised recidivism isn’t higher than it already is!

Who’s going to change it? Felons can’t even vote, dude. Can you believe that? We hold our democracy above all else, but nope, once you’re a felon, you don’t get to have a say.

America!

(via fatmanatee)

posted 2 weeks ago

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John Oliver is amazing.

(Source: sandandglass, via lizlet)

posted 3 weeks ago

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LA Drought Status: Middle of the day watering, man attempts to drown his dirt until the plant beds are overflowing. We’re all doomed.

LA Drought Status: Middle of the day watering, man attempts to drown his dirt until the plant beds are overflowing. We’re all doomed.

posted 3 weeks ago

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jessehimself:

priorities be like

Did you know that death row inmates cost $175,000 per inmate per year? That’s $177 million. There was a measure on the 2012 ballot to eliminate California’s death penalty, which would have saved the state millions of dollars each year. It failed. California has executed “only” 13 people since 1978. 36 years. Most death row inmates sit on death row for upwards of 25 years, costing the state much more than if they weren’t on death row at all.
But with the statistic above, we’re talking about 6.2 million students compared to only about 186,000 inmates. It’s not all that bizarre to have such a disparity. Prisoners are given all their meals, their clothing, housing, public defenders, all the guards salaries, so on and so forth. We can’t know how much private money is spent on most students each year, but I feel comfortable presuming it’s more than $62,300. The entirety of a prisoner’s needs are placed upon the state. The same can’t be said for students.
Not that I know what this PSA is attempting to imply. Should we close our prisons so we can spend more money on kids? I absolutely agree that kids deserve better than whatever standardized measurements we us, but I don’t think it should be at the cost of prisons.
Although, when you get right down to it, our Department of Corrections, both at the state level and nationally, is a for-profit business. I mean this both literally, in that California pays a private company running their own prisons to handle many thousands of California’s incarcerated, and also figuratively, in the sense that recidivism is incentivized. If you’re the California DOC, more prisoners equals bigger budgets. If you’re a private prison company (of which there are many across the nation), that means bigger profits. It benefits your bottom line to make sure that inmates return to you. It benefits your bottom line to keep the three strikes law on the books or to have harsher penalties for something like drug possession. As of 2012, California’s recidivism rate stood at over 65%. Guaranteed income for the prison business.
Regardless, it’s a powerful ad. Californians for Safety and Justice (www.safeandjust.org) seems to be an organization dedicated to prison reform, which is desperately needed in this country where we have a higher incarceration rate than anywhere else in the world.
I’m sorry. I don’t know where this ramble came from.
TL;DR the prison system is pretty screwed up.

jessehimself:

priorities be like

Did you know that death row inmates cost $175,000 per inmate per year? That’s $177 million. There was a measure on the 2012 ballot to eliminate California’s death penalty, which would have saved the state millions of dollars each year. It failed. California has executed “only” 13 people since 1978. 36 years. Most death row inmates sit on death row for upwards of 25 years, costing the state much more than if they weren’t on death row at all.

But with the statistic above, we’re talking about 6.2 million students compared to only about 186,000 inmates. It’s not all that bizarre to have such a disparity. Prisoners are given all their meals, their clothing, housing, public defenders, all the guards salaries, so on and so forth. We can’t know how much private money is spent on most students each year, but I feel comfortable presuming it’s more than $62,300. The entirety of a prisoner’s needs are placed upon the state. The same can’t be said for students.

Not that I know what this PSA is attempting to imply. Should we close our prisons so we can spend more money on kids? I absolutely agree that kids deserve better than whatever standardized measurements we us, but I don’t think it should be at the cost of prisons.

Although, when you get right down to it, our Department of Corrections, both at the state level and nationally, is a for-profit business. I mean this both literally, in that California pays a private company running their own prisons to handle many thousands of California’s incarcerated, and also figuratively, in the sense that recidivism is incentivized. If you’re the California DOC, more prisoners equals bigger budgets. If you’re a private prison company (of which there are many across the nation), that means bigger profits. It benefits your bottom line to make sure that inmates return to you. It benefits your bottom line to keep the three strikes law on the books or to have harsher penalties for something like drug possession. As of 2012, California’s recidivism rate stood at over 65%. Guaranteed income for the prison business.

Regardless, it’s a powerful ad. Californians for Safety and Justice (www.safeandjust.org) seems to be an organization dedicated to prison reform, which is desperately needed in this country where we have a higher incarceration rate than anywhere else in the world.

I’m sorry. I don’t know where this ramble came from.

TL;DR the prison system is pretty screwed up.

(via tumblangeles)

posted 3 weeks ago

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9:49 a.m. I make my way to Station 3, which is the line to get your picture taken while sitting on the Central Perk couch. It is the primary reason people are here. The line is about 20 people long, so I chat with the guy manning Station 4 (the gift shop) while I wait.

Me: Do y’all have any hats?

Gift Shop Guy: Nope, sold out. You had to get here at like 7:15 on the weekend.

Me: Yeah, I’m not about that life.

Gift Shop Guy: I feel you. And this isn’t even real life.

The depth of that response paralyzes me. I can’t even respond. I just stay in line.

Rembert Browne’s account of visiting Central Perk is a must-read for any current or former or future Friends fan. I only wish I could have been there on the journey next to him.

posted 4 weeks ago

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humansofnewyork:

Had a 24 hour stopover in Kathmandu, Nepal, where I visited the Pashupatinath Hindu Temple. The temple is popular with tourists, and the resident priests have become experts at ‘casually’ positioning themselves in oh-so-photographical arrangements. They then collect donations in exchange for ‘authentic’ photographs. Motives aside, they do a beautiful job, and the scenes they create seem worthy of a Hollywood art director. 
(Kathmandu, Nepal)

Motives aside? Dude, you want to talk about cultural appropriation? BING! here we are. Should their motives be “yes, please put my culture on display”? They are already doing you a favor by not immediately telling you to piss off.
Can we propose a hypothetical? Let’s have tourists from Asia come to the US and take pictures of priests and ministers at churches all day long. All day. Including services. Would you question their motives if they asked for donations when you’re constantly taking pictures of them?
I myself have taken pictures of Hindu priests. I think their robes and colorings are amazing and make for some exquisite pictures too! But I’d never question their motives of wanting a donation for me shoving a camera in their face. They SHOULD get some money for my obnoxiousness! 
We even have this in America. We give people money for the pleasure of taking pictures of them. Then we put them on display and critique them until they’re less than human. It’s called modeling.
Anyway, rant over. Never liked HONY, never will.

humansofnewyork:

Had a 24 hour stopover in Kathmandu, Nepal, where I visited the Pashupatinath Hindu Temple. The temple is popular with tourists, and the resident priests have become experts at ‘casually’ positioning themselves in oh-so-photographical arrangements. They then collect donations in exchange for ‘authentic’ photographs. Motives aside, they do a beautiful job, and the scenes they create seem worthy of a Hollywood art director. 

(Kathmandu, Nepal)

Motives aside? Dude, you want to talk about cultural appropriation? BING! here we are. Should their motives be “yes, please put my culture on display”? They are already doing you a favor by not immediately telling you to piss off.

Can we propose a hypothetical? Let’s have tourists from Asia come to the US and take pictures of priests and ministers at churches all day long. All day. Including services. Would you question their motives if they asked for donations when you’re constantly taking pictures of them?

I myself have taken pictures of Hindu priests. I think their robes and colorings are amazing and make for some exquisite pictures too! But I’d never question their motives of wanting a donation for me shoving a camera in their face. They SHOULD get some money for my obnoxiousness!

We even have this in America. We give people money for the pleasure of taking pictures of them. Then we put them on display and critique them until they’re less than human. It’s called modeling.

Anyway, rant over. Never liked HONY, never will.

posted 1 month ago

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I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.’

-Toni Morrison (via medievalpoc)

Damn, this is some seriously smart thinking.

(via samhumphries)

posted 1 month ago

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Got my new iPhone y’all! Don’t be jealous.

Got my new iPhone y’all! Don’t be jealous.

posted 1 month ago

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